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Matt Gonzalez show opens June 28th at Park Life.

June 10th, 2013

Matt Gonzalez

Things I Didnt Know I Loved

See the Work here

Opening Reception Friday June 28th.  7-10pm

June 28th – July 28th

For his first show at Park Life, Matt Gonzalez will be presenting new mixed-media collage works on paper and wood sculpture.
Matt’s work is born from gathering the detritus we discard on a daily basis and giving it a second life by reassembling the pieces and presenting them in a new context as commentary about the marketing, advertising and consuming that occurs every day in our society.
Matt’s work raises the environmental concerns about how our society decides what is waste and how we dispose of it. The discarded materials are all culled from city streets and repurposed by way of a very personal intervention.  Matt’s work comments on consumerism and capitalism and how paper is used in the presentation of “articles for sale,” usually in colorful packaging to make them more enticing. Through marketing sellers and advertisers sell products to us by making them attractive through festive packaging. The recasting of the messaging and colors into a new vessel suggests a second life, a fresh offering, one that says something more authentic and rather than the hawking of a product. This small human assembly of scraps calls into question the whole notion of selling things and competing to make them look pretty for a profit. It poses the question of whether the wrapping is itself as beautiful as anything it contains.
Also, the work addresses the concept of cognitive liberty. In the way the 20th century was preoccupied with matters of the body and personal liberty (rights such as being free from search & seizure, or free speech rights), the 21st century, because of technological advances, is going to pose the question of what messaging human beings can be bombarded with. The subliminal advertising of the 1970s has evolved into messaging that confronts us while we are on other people’s property, in a restaurant, even when we travel on the public roads and sidewalks. By disrupting these legible messages he repudiates the right of advertisers and others to compel me to think a certain way.  And, by reducing words to their parts, just as the Russian Futurists did with Zaum poetry (where a part of a word could suggest further meaning), the recast language in the collages suggest commentary and stand as liberated reminders of the battle over influence and forced ideas.

Matt Gonzalez is a native of McAllen, Texas and received his BA from Columbia University. He has had solo shows at Soap Gallery and Adobe Books and been included in group exhibitions at Guerrero Gallery, Fecal Face Dot Gallery, 111 Minna Street, Johansson Projects, and Triple Base Gallery. He has taught Art & Politics at SFAI and has written about various artists including Kurt Schwitters, Gustavo Rivera, Andrew Schoultz, Eva Hesse, Theophilus Brown, Guy Colwell, and Keegan McHargue among others.